2-very ampleness for adjoint bundles of ample and spanned by Lanteri A.

By Lanteri A.

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A greater focal length means higher magnification. However, magnification comes at a price. Magnifying an image can be envisaged as spreading the light more thinly over a larger area. Hence, to magnify an image and retain the same brightness, more light is required. The only way to get more light is to make the corneal lens wider. The other consequence of magnifying an image is that the more it is enlarged, the less of it will be in view. In short, by having a longer focal length, the AM eyes have smaller fields of view than the secondary eyes and yet they require larger lenses.

This is functionally similar to the mammalian fovea; that is, spatial acuity (the ability to resolve detail) is especially good in the mammalian fovea and, in the salticid, in the central region of the retina of the principal eye. This division of functions (detection of peripheral movement and assessment of detail) into two types of eyes appears to be an evolutionary response to the limitations of size. For example, transposing the equivalent of a spherical vertebrate eye into a salticid’s body would not be a workable option because an eye’s optical performance is critically tied to the ratio between the diameter of the lens (aperture) and its ability to magnify (focal length) (M.

This division of functions (detection of peripheral movement and assessment of detail) into two types of eyes appears to be an evolutionary response to the limitations of size. For example, transposing the equivalent of a spherical vertebrate eye into a salticid’s body would not be a workable option because an eye’s optical performance is critically tied to the ratio between the diameter of the lens (aperture) and its ability to magnify (focal length) (M. F. Land, 1974, 1981; Land and Nilsson, 2002).

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