A Grammar of Bilinarra: An Australian Aboriginal Language of by Rachel Nordlinger, Felicity Meakins

By Rachel Nordlinger, Felicity Meakins

This quantity is a grammatical description of Bilinarra, an endangered Australian language. This paintings attracts on fabrics accrued over a 20-year interval from the final first-language audio system of the language, so much of whom have considering the fact that passed on to the great beyond. specific consciousness is paid to all elements of the grammar, with all examples supplied with linked sound records.

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Additional resources for A Grammar of Bilinarra: An Australian Aboriginal Language of the Northern Territory

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We have endeavoured to include everything we can about the grammar of the traditional language, but inevitably there are gaps in our description, given the limited nature of the data available to us. The nature of the corpus is described in detail in the ‘Recording metadata’ section. All recordings and photos of people, deceased and alive, are used at the request of the families and with their permission. 2 Bilinarra in relation to Gurindji and Ngarinyman Bilinarra is very closely related to Gurindji and Ngarinyman.

All materials are held with the organisation in Katherine, Northern Territory. Dugu ‘Mussels’ Story was recorded in 2002 by Erika Charola with Ivy Kulngari Nangari-Nambijina† at Pigeon Hole. It exists on a video. Girrawa ‘Goanna’ Story was recorded in 2005 by Justin Spence with Ivy Kulngari Nangari-Nambijina† at Pigeon Hole. It exists as an unpublished booklet. Jungguwurru ‘Echidna’ Story was recorded in 2005 by Justin Spence with Ivy Kulngari Nangari-Nambijina† at Pigeon Hole. It was transcribed by Justin Spence and Lauren Campbell and exists as an unpublished booklet.

The Aboriginal workers and their families lived in humpies built from tin, hessian and tree limbs in cleared areas with few trees and therefore little shade. These clusters of humpies had no running water. Women carted water from nearby creeks or bores, or horse troughs when other sources ran dry. The camps also had no sanitation facilities so people were forced to make use of dry creek beds. Given the permanency of the camps, this had serious consequences for the health of the inhabitants. The diet of the Aboriginal workers and their families was little better.

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